Making the Gletcher PM 1951 shoot to the point of aim

If you have read my review of the Gletcher PM1951, you’ll know that, while it wasn’t a bad shooter, it hits around 2” below the point of aim. I hate replicas that shoot low. I don’t know why: I can just about tolerate something that shoots high, but not low. On a replica such as this which has fixed front and rear sights, I can’t simply adjust the sights to take care of the problem. If this was a 6mm replica, I’d switch to using a lighter BB and/or adjust the hop-up. But on a 4.5mm replica, I don’t have either option. So, is there anything you can do about it if your 4.5mm replica shoots low?

Happily, the answer is yes. Sort of. Let me explain. If the point of impact is below the point of aim, you have two options: you can raise the point of impact by raising the barrel or you can lower the point of aim by modifying the sights. On the Gletcher PM1951, the barrel is rigidly fixed to the frame, just as it is on the Makarov pistol this replica is based on. That means that there isn’t a quick or simple way to change the angle of the barrel.

On replicas like this where the front sight is an integral part of the slide, the only option is to file it down.

On this replica, the only option is to modify the sights. If I want to lower the point of aim, I need to either lower the front sight or raise the rear sight. There doesn’t appear to be a simple way of raising the rear sight, so the only thing left is to lower the front sight by filing it down.

Before you start anything like this, make sure that you first do plenty of reference shooting. You want to establish a known baseline before you start making any alterations. When you’re doing this, use the same steel BBs all the time to ensure consistency. I have shot a few hundred rounds through the PM and I am confident that the centre of typical groups is around 2” below the point of aim. You can see a typical target below.

10 shots, Umarex Steel BBs, 6m, semi-rested. Point of aim is the centre of the black circle. The group is very respectable but its centre is approximately 2” below the point of aim. And yes, I know the target’s upside down.

So, we need to lower the front sight to raise the point of impact. On a replica where the sight is a non-removable part of the slide, the only option is to file the sight down. There are two things to consider here: the first is that a small change in the height of the front sight makes a large difference to the point of aim and the zinc alloy from which replicas are made is relatively soft so, don’t try to take too much off in one go. File off small amounts each time and then shoot to check how things are progressing. The second thing is that, given the generally thin and fragile finishes applied to our replicas, it’s horribly easy to inadvertently put a large scrape or scratch on the finish of the top of the slide when you’re filing the sight. Guess how I know that? That’s right, because I tried filing down the front sight of my Cybergun P226 X5 without using a mask and I put a scratch right along the top of the slide. So, you need to make a simple mask that will allow you to file the sight without risking damaging the slide.

On the PM, I removed the slide and then used a piece of card to make a mask which I taped in place round the slide. This left only the sight projecting and stopped me from scraping the top of the slide. Then, it was just a case of filing a little at a time and testing by shooting.

Having said that you should take off a little at a time, I had to file the PM sight down more than I expected to get the point of aim and the point of impact to coincide. However, when I was done, I had a PM that shoots where it’s aimed.

After filing, 10 shots, Umarex steel BBs, 6m, semi-rested. Aim point was again the centre of the black circle. The group isn’t as tight this time, probably because I shot fairly quickly, but at least it’s vertically centred on the black circle and six out of the ten shots are inside the inner circle. And the target’s still upside down…

So, that wasn’t too difficult. In less than an hour I went from a replica that was hitting two inches below the point of aim at 6m to one that shoots pretty well where it’s aimed. The front sight has ended up smaller than I would have liked, but I’m willing to put up with that in return for a better shooting experience.

A quick dab with a black permanent marker pen and it’s good to go. Another job can be ticked off the list and I can start to really enjoy shooting this replica.

Happy shooting

Related pages

Gletcher PM 1951 review

Are all steel BBs the same?

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